American Flag Guidelines You Need to Know

You have no doubt been wondering, ever since 1923, exactly how the American flag ought to be displayed. That, of course, being the year that the government ratified the United States Flag Code, although at that time it was more or less merely a codification of the procedures and regulations that the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army had already been following.

The next year, as you recall, the National Flag Conference made some slight changes to the Code and called it good, leaving it to Congress to eventually draft a resolution recognizing the Code as Law. Which, you certainly recollect, they got around to doing in 1942. Continue reading

A Flag Etiquette Primer

usa-1149896_1280As a symbol of hope and unity, the American  flag is without peer, serving to remind all who behold it that, so long as it flies, freedom will triumph.

Flown proudly outside of schools, churches, and government buildings alike, American flags are a solemn gesture of solidarity and patriotism for the greatest country on earth.

Our history is a remarkable one, and its struggle is evidenced in the very fabric of the flag: red for the blood spilt in the name of liberty, white for purity and equality, and blue for justice. Because of this, it is our duty to honor our flags properly as the embodiment of all that makes this country great.

Paying Respect

The Flag Code is the formal body of instruction we must follow in order to properly honor the flag. It contains specific instructions regarding how the flag ought to be used and not used. Take a look at some of its most important standards of respect:

  • The flag may never be bowed down to anyone or anything.
  • The flag should only be flown upside-down as a signal of distress or emergency.
  • The flag must never be worn nor draped over any surface for use as decoration. (Bunting should be used for this.)
  • The flag should not be used for advertising purposes. Similarly, it should not be printed on any disposable articles, such as napkins or paper plates.
  • The flag should not be worn as costume; however, a flag patch is acceptable on the uniforms of military personnel, as well as policeman and other similar groups.
  • Whenever the flag is lowered, no part of it should touch the ground.
  • When stored, it should be folded crisply and with dignity.

Contrary to some beliefs, the burning of the flag is, in fact, appropriate when the flag is too worn, so long as the burning is done in a dignified and ceremonious manner. Many American Legion Posts, as well as Boy Scout Troops, often have regular flag burning ceremonies to retire flags that are no longer suited for flying.

Raising and Lowering the Flag

As a rule, the flag ought to be displayed only during the hours between sunrise and sunset, although it may be displayed at night so long as it is illuminated. Raised quickly and lowered slowly, the flag is saluted while both ascending and descending.

Flying the Flag Outdoors

When flying the flag outdoors on a staff, the union (the stars) must be level with the peak of the staff, unless it is being flown half-staff. If another flag is being flown from the same staff, the United States flag must be on top (with only certain religious exceptions), and it must be the largest.  It should also be the first raised and last lowered. When displayed over a street, the flag should be hung vertically with the union to the north or east.

The Flag Indoors

The flag displayed inside should always have the place of honor, and, when situated behind a speaker or stage, it should be placed to its right (the observer’s left) while other flags should be placed to the left. Additionally, the flag of the United States of America should always be in the center of and at the apogee of any grouping of other flags. If two staffs are crossed, the American flag should be on its own right with its staff in front of the other. If displayed against a wall, the union should be to the observer’s left.

The Salute

Saluting is one of the most important ways in which to pay respect to the flag. Citizens should place their right hand over their heart to do so properly. Men with hats or caps, however, should remove the headpiece and hold it to their left shoulder over their heart. Uniformed personnel offer their own formal salute.

The Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem

The pledge of allegiance should be recited while standing at attention, facing the flag and saluting it. Similarly, the national anthem requires that you stand at attention, beginning your salute at the first note, and holding it until completion. If the flag is not visible during the presentation, salute toward the music.

In Mourning

There are few times when the flag means more than in times of mourning. Making sure it is properly honored is of paramount importance.

When raising the flag to half-staff, first raise the flag briefly to the peak before lowering it to the middle-point. When lowering the flag, again, bring it first to peak. It should be noted that on Memorial Day the flag ought to be raised at half-staff until noon, before being raised to full-staff from noon until sunset.

When covering a casket, the union should be at the head and over the left shoulder. The flag is not lowered into the ground.

The United States of America has an extremely proud and storied history. Whether you or your loved ones are veterans, current service members, or simply patriots, there is no better way to honor the struggle and majesty of this country than by honoring the flag. It’s a simple measure, but it’s a powerful one – and it’s one that speaks volumes.

How to Properly Dispose of a Damaged American Flag

tattered-flag-432580_640The American flag is an honorable thing, embodying the very spirit and ideals upon which this country was founded, and for which so many have fought so valiantly. To honor those values as well as that sacrifice, it is important to take pride in your flag. To that end, there may come a time when your flag becomes worn or damaged, and you must appropriately and dutifully dispose of the old flag before flying anew.

Disposing of a damaged flag properly is an important part of maintaining the respect, reverence, and honor for The Stars and Stripes. Take a look below for some general information regarding proper disposal techniques.

Burning the Flag in a Respectable Manner

Contrary to what some believe, the most appropriate and respectful method of disposing of a worn or damaged flag is to burn it. In order to achieve a proper and dignified flag burning (as well as a safe one), certain steps should be taken beforehand.

Check local burning laws in your area. Some local authorities prohibit building fires without obtaining a permit from the city.

If it is windy outside, consider postponing the burning ceremony until the weather is more suitable.

Construct a fire in a safe location. If possible, use a fire pit that is already in place.

Make sure the area is clean prior to ignition, by sweeping away any leaves, garbage, or debris. These pose a potential fire hazard, as well as their not holding with an environment of respect.

Once the fire has been lit, wait until it has reached a steady burn. The fire must be strong enough to burn the flag, but not so strong that pieces of the flag don’t fully incinerate.

The flag should then be folded in the traditional triangle fold.

Always treat the flag with respect, and do not put it on the ground or carry anything on top of it as you make your way to the fire.

Gently place the folded flag into the fire pit. As the flag burns, keep an eye on it to ensure it is burning safely.

It is customary during this process to come to attention, salute the flag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance, and finish with a brief period of silence.

After the flag is completely burned, the fire should be safely extinguished, and the ashes buried.

Burying the Flag

If you are unable to burn a flag, there are alternative methods which are also respectful and appropriate. For some, burying the flag is a viable alternative. If you opt to bury your worn or damaged flag, take a look at the information below.

  • Choose an appropriate box made of high-quality material.
  • Properly fold the flag and place it inside of the box.
  • Dig a deep enough hole in the earth so that the flag cannot be retrieved by animals or lawn equipment.
  • Consider marking the spot of burial with a small marker. 

Shredding the Flag

Still others elect to shred their old flags, and then either bury or burn the pieces. The U.S. Army recommends this as another, viable method of disposal.

  • To shred the flag, use scissors to cut apart the 13 stripes.
  • Leave the blue star-spangled field in one piece.
  • For burial: Once the flag is cut, place the parts into a box and follow burial instructions above.
  • For burning: Place the pieces of the flag into the fire one by one and follow the instructions regarding burning above.

Recycling the Flag

Today, many flags are made of nylon, polyester, and other artificial materials, all of which can be recycled. Indeed, if burned, some of these materials can create toxic fumes that are harmful to the air you breathe. To remedy this, there exist many private organizations and non-profits that will recycle flags for you safely and respectfully.

Pass the Flag Along to a Qualified Organization

In addition to companies that will recycle old or damaged flags, many organizations will properly and ceremoniously dispose of your flag. Some of the most popular of these agencies include The American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts of America and the U.S. Military.

Conclusion

American flags are more than just the fabric they are woven from. They are a symbol of unity, perseverance, justice, and freedom. Whether you opt to burn your flag, shred it, recycle it, or pass it along to another group to handle, make sure you take the time to carefully and responsibly retire your flag. It may seem like a small gesture, but it is a powerful one all the same. 

Top 10 Rules of American Flag Courtesy

flagfoldingsihouette-copyThe American flag is not just a colored piece of cloth. It is a symbol of our country. From its inception, to the Flag Act of 1777, the United States was creating a symbol that its men and women could rally around. Yet, until 1912, there was not a specific rule as to the size of the flag, its proportions, or the arrangement of the stars.  This was changed by Executive Order on June 24, 1912. The current form of the United States flag with its 50 stars and 13 stripes was made official on July 4, 1960.

Since the American flag represents our country, it should be treated with the utmost respect. Countless men and women have given their lives in support of this flag. When you show respect to the flag, you honor them, as well.

Let’s take a brief look at 10 of the most common rules of flag courtesy.

1.  The United States flag is to be the first flag raised and the last flag lowered. It should be displayed on its own flagstaff, but if another flag is to be flown on the same staff, the other flag must be smaller and flown underneath the American flag.

2.  When being flown with other flags on separate staffs, the United States flag should be in the center and at the highest point.

3.  The union (blue background with the stars) is always to be flown at the top unless the flag is being flown in distress.

4.  The flag should always be flown at full-staff unless it is being flown at half-mast as part of a declared period of honor or mourning. When bringing a flag to half-mast, it should first be raised to the top of the staff, and then ceremoniously lowered. To bring the flag down, first raise it to full-mast, and then lower it with customary honor.

5.  The American flag should always be flown away from obstacles and items that would obscure it. It is meant to fly free and should not be in danger of becoming entangled.

6.  Only flags that have been specially constructed for outdoor use should be flown outside. A torn or tattered flag should not be displayed. On that same note, flags should not be flown in inclement weather unless they are designed for such use, and the American flag should not be flown at night unless it is illuminated.

7.  During a parade, the American flag is to be to its own right or at the front and center of other flags also being presented. The American flag should never be “dipped,” but remain upright and flown with honor.

8. The flag should not touch the ground, floor, or goods that it is being flown near. If a flag is soiled, it may be hand-washed with warm water and color-safe soap. Lay it flat to dry, but ensure that it does not touch the ground or floor during this process.

9.  When  indoors, the flag should be displayed to the viewers’ left, to its own right on a stage or podium. All other flags should be to stage left, the viewers’ right. If being hung on the wall, it is to be centered behind the speaker. When on a wall or podium, it can be hung horizontally or vertically, but the union is always to be to the upper left as viewed by the audience.

10.  When the flag is presented, all in attendance should stand at attention and either salute or place their right hand over their heart. The same honor should be given during the Pledge of Allegiance or the singing of the National Anthem. Men should remove their hats.

11.  The American flag should be folded and stored properly. To do so, it should be folded in half twice, and then triangle folded toward the union. When only the union is remaining, fold the union into a triangle and tuck it into the flag’s folds.

12.  When the United States flag is no longer serviceable, it should be respectfully and ceremoniously burned. It is disrespectful to fly a tattered flag, and an American flag should never be thrown in the garbage. Most military organizations, including the VFW and American Legion, will help you dispose of your old flags.

When it is time to purchase a new flag, be sure that you buy one that will last and which is designed for the purpose you have in mind. From indoor and outdoor flags, handheld, car, and stick flags, AmericanFlag.com has the quality you need at the price you can afford.

Top 6 Flag Rules of American Flag Care

american-flagThe American flag represents the United States of America. It is an important part of our country and should be cared for in the manner it deserves.

Outdoor Display

The American flag should be displayed from sunrise to sunset at all government buildings and schools. The flag should be attached to a stationary flagstaff that has a prominent place out in the open so the flag can fly free and unencumbered. The flag should only be flown in good weather unless a flag that is constructed of weather resistant material is used. Flying a torn and tattered flag is not respectful.

The United States flag is not to be flown in the dark unless it is illuminated. Should you desire to fly your flag at all hours and in all conditions, AmericanFlags.com can provide flags of any size desired, constructed with materials designed to stand up to the toughest of conditions. They will also work with you to provide lighting solutions if you do not already have them in place.

The flags are to be flown with the union up, unless you are under duress, and should always be flown at full staff unless a time of mourning has been declared. When flying a flag at half-staff, first raise it all of the way to the top, and then ceremoniously lower it to half-staff. When bringing it down, raise the flag back to full staff prior to lowering it.

Indoor Display

The American flag should be displayed to the right of a stage and speaker (the left for the person facing the stage). All other flags should be placed to the speaker’s left. No flag should be larger or displayed higher than the American flag. If the flag is hung behind the speaker or on a podium, the flag may be horizontal or vertical, but the union is always to the observer’s left.

When being moved in a procession, the American flag must be to the flag’s own right or in the front center of any other flags. The American flag is never to be dipped.

Respect

The flag of the United States should not touch the ground or anything that is beneath it, including the floor, water, or another surface. If the flag gets wet, it is okay to lay it flat to dry it, since you should never fold a damp or wet flag.

To keep the flag bright and clean, it is acceptable to hand wash the flag with warm water and a color-safe detergent. Many times a dry cleaner will clean the American flag for free. During the cleaning process, be sure to keep the flag off of the floor or ground. Unless you are drying the flag, it should never be draped over anything, but always be kept upright and hanging or flying freely.

Storage

The flag should be folded properly before it is stored. The American flag should not be crumpled or tossed in a pile, put in a basket, etc. It should not be stored in any manner that would permit it to be torn, dirtied, or damaged.

To fold the flag, two people should face each other while holding opposite ends of the flag. Fold it in half lengthwise, twice. The union (blue) will be at one end. The person opposite the union starts by folding the flag in a triangular fold until they reach the union. Fold the union square into a triangle and tuck it into the folded flag.


Disposal

Should an American flag become worn or soiled, it should be disposed of in a dignified manner and never thrown in the trash. The most dignified manner is by burning it ceremoniously. Most military organizations such as the VFW or American Legion will take your old flags and make sure they are disposed of properly.

Salute

When the flag is being moved or presented, observers who are not in a military uniform should stand at attention and place their right hand over their heart. Men should remove their hats. Those who are in military uniforms should render the appropriate salute. Former members of the United States military or their family may choose to render a salute as well.

The same honor should be shown to the flag during the pledge of allegiance or singing of the national anthem.

One of the best ways you can show respect to and care for the flag is by purchasing a flag that has been designed and created to stand up to its use and purpose. At AmericanFlags.com, every flag is constructed of the finest materials with the highest-quality right here in the United States.

7 Ways to Display Your American Flag

Image 1The American flag is not just a piece of material; it is a symbol of your country. As such, it should be treated with respect and care. Most people are familiar with the traditional flying of the flag from a flagpole at government buildings, schools, etc., and many others show their national pride by flying the flag from their residence. Beyond these standard displays, there are many other ways to display your flag. Most of them are such a part of our life that we don’t notice them anymore, but if they were gone it would surely leave a giant hole in the fabric of our country.

Let’s look at seven ways to display the American flag.

Stationary Flagpole

If you have a stationary flagpole, your American flag can be flown proudly above your business or residence. If there are other flags that are also flown, the American flag is to be flown above them at the highest level, and no other flag is to be larger than the American flag. When flags are flown outdoors, they should be made of a material that can withstand the winds, since flying a tattered flag is not acceptable.

Flags should not be flown in inclement weather unless they were designed for this purpose. For example, AmericanFlags.com offers outdoor flags constructed from 100% 2-ply, spun woven polyester that is resistant to high winds, rain, and snow with bright, fade-resistant colors. These flags meet U.S. government and military specifications.

American flags are not to be flown at night unless they are illuminated.

Removable Flagpole

Many homes and businesses have a flag that is attached to a removable pole that can be placed attached to the home or business. These flags should be flown in such a way that they will not touch the ground or be caught up in foliage, branches, or other obstacles, as the American flag must always be able to fly freely. If these flags are to be flown at night, ensure they are illuminated.

Should you desire your flag to fly in inclement weather, ensure that it is constructed of the same superior material as those flown on a stationary pole. If your flag will be taken down during these times, you might consider a flag of durable nylon or even a Bulldog Cotton American flag.

AmericanFlags.com makes flying the flag easy and affordable with complete residential flag sets in both lighted and unlighted varieties.

Stick Flags

When you don’t have the option to fly a flag from your own post, or simply want to add to the experience, stick flags are a great alternative. These flags are smaller but just as powerful in their message. Consider putting them in a planter box or lining the walkway. AmericanFlags.com even has a stick flag with a solar-operated light on the top.

Grave Markers

There is no greater way to honor the memory of those who have fought and died so bravely for our country than to remember them with the flag they served under.

Indoor Flagpole

Whether it is for a ceremony or a permanent display, an indoor flagpole is the way to go. The flag should always be displayed to the right of a stage or speaking area – to the audience’s left. Because so many walkway ceilings are low, it is important to carefully secure the flag and carry the pole properly instead of tilting the pole and dragging the flag.

Cars

Flying the American flag on your car is a way to show your patriotism wherever you go. Car flags are designed to be flown in and around town. Their life will be shortened if used at high speeds or in inclement weather. Car dealers will want to display these flags on all of their models during patriotic holidays.

Hands

During patriotic holidays, every hand should have a flag in it. Be sure to have enough flags for each member of your family. Waving the flag is a great way to teach your children about the importance of patriotism. Get them for your classes at school, for your youth at church, or for the neighborhood.

There are so many ways to recognize your country by proudly displaying the American flag. Not only does it show patriotism, but it is a great way to say thank you to the men and women who have served their country with honor and distinction. Knowing that it is so important to do so, AmericanFlags.com has made it possible to purchase the style and size you require at a price that you can afford.

Flags to be at Half Staff in honor of Supreme Court Justice Scalia

halfstaffThe White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release

February 13, 2016

Presidential Proclamation: Death of Antonin Scalia

As a mark of respect for Antonin Scalia, Associate Justice of the United States, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including section 7 of title 4, United States Code, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and on all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, on the day of interment. I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same period at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

BARACK OBAMA

Honoring Our Fallen: The American Flag Presentation

military-funeralEvery day men and women join our Armed Services, some making the ultimate sacrifice in laying down their lives. The worst moment in any spouse, parent, or child’s life is seeing the uniformed soldier walk up to your front door, knowing exactly what it is they are about to tell you. You heart races, a churning in your stomach, knowing the person you love most in the world has given their life to protect our country and freedom.

For the comrades, the most difficult duty they ever perform is driving to the home of the fallen soldier’s parents. Once they greet the family, they present a tri-folded American flag to commemorate the fallen soldier. The soldier’s comrades will say something along the lines of, “Your son/daughter fought honorably. On behalf of the President of the United States, please accept this flag as a gift in appreciation for the sacrifice your son/daughter has made.”

To honor these heroes, the military has an established a beautiful burial ceremony, with slight differences depending on the branch of armed forces in which the fallen fought and died. The wishes of the fallen soldier and the family are always taken into consideration, to ensure the preferred religious requirements are included in the ceremony.

As a military funeral begins, the flags are lowered to half-mast, in honor of the soldier who died. This gesture is often comforting to the family, knowing their departed loved one died for the country they loved, and that their memory will live on in every American by honoring his or her sacrifice.

Most funerals are presided over by a priest, minister, pastor or other religious figure, and they will speak comforting words about the fallen hero, including appropriate excerpts that are beautiful and heartening. In a military funeral, some things remain the same across the different branches of service.

Traditionally, the American flag is laid across the casket, with the blue stars over the heart (left side) of the fallen hero. Often, after the religious part of the ceremony has completed, there will be a 21 gun salute, while another soldier plays “Taps” on the trumpet. This is the most saddening part of any funeral, as the notes played pull at your heartstrings like nothing else will.

While Taps is being played, officers from the deceased’s branch of service will take the edges of the flag and begin the 13 folds, which, since the inception of this tradition, have developed multiple meanings. The most common words spoken by the officers are:

The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life.

The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world.

The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for, as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for His divine guidance.

The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for, in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.

The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered in to the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on Mother’s Day.

The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.

The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.

The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.

When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, “In God we Trust.”

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the sailors and marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today. You can read more scripts for the folding of the American flag.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, the flag is presented to the next of kin, often the parents, spouse, or child of the fallen hero. Depending on the branch of the Armed Services in which the deceased served, the phrase the officer says to the family upon presenting the flag may change a bit. Below are the comforting words of appreciation used, courtesy of Military Salute:

U.S. Air Force: “On behalf of the President of the United States, the Department of the Air Force, and a grateful nation, we offer this flag for the faithful and dedicated service of (Service Member’s rank and name).”

U.S. Army: “This flag is presented on behalf of a grateful nation and the United States Army as a token of appreciation for your loved one’s honorable and faithful service.”

U.S. Coast Guard: “On behalf of the President of the United States, the Commandant of the Coast Guard, and a grateful nation, please accept this flag as a symbol of our appreciation for your loved one’s service to Country and the Coast Guard.”

U.S. Marine Corps: “On behalf of the President of the United States, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, and a grateful nation, please accept this flag as a symbol of our appreciation for your loved one’s service to Country and Corps.”

U.S. Navy: “On behalf of the President of the United States and the Chief of Naval Operations, please accept this flag as a symbol of our appreciation for your loved one’s service to this Country and a grateful Navy.”

These ceremonies are extremely emotional and often come too soon in a soldier’s life. The best thing anyone can do is be sure to use a flag made by Americans, for Americans, to honor an American soldier. You can find the highest quality flags available at AmericanFlags.com, founded in Long Island, New York just one month after 9/11.

The Stars and Stripes

stars-and-stripes

At its most basic level, a flag is simply fabric, some color, maybe a pattern, and some stitching to pull it all together. However, a flag is not the sum of the materials that make it up; the worth of a flag is in the sum of ideas that it represents. While Betsy Ross understood that the cloth she fabricated into 13 stars, and 13 stripes was to represent a burgeoning nation, she could not have foreseen what that banner would come to represent, what would become the fabric of the nation that was coming to life.

Rather, flying over the White House, or your own house, our American flag is now a universal symbol of liberty, freedom, and democracy the world over. Rather, raised by valiant Marines over Iwo Jima in that most iconic of images, or raised by your own family on the fourth of July, the Stars and Stripes is flown with pride, pride in our nation, in our noble history, and our present role as the guardians of liberty around the globe.

Crafted and first hoisted in rebellion during troubled times, the pigments and patterns have long encapsulated the elements of what it means to be American: pride, honesty, and the value of hard work. Strong and flexible, the very threads of the American flag reflect the complex interwoven mixture of cultures and values that have produced our unique and multifaceted national character.

While initially speaking of the colors of our Nation’s Great Seal, the shared colors of the Stars and Stripes have, over time, become enriched with meaning, expanding on our national legacy, each significant for the virtues and values they represent within our republic: White for the purity and innocence of a new nation; red to represent the valor, hardiness, and commitment that would be necessary to defend the republic; and blue to embody the vigilance and justice necessary to ensure the perseverance of the noble experiment the nation has built and sustained. A nation as Lincoln so eloquently stated, which was conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Is there any wonder why our flag commands such strong emotions and such respect across the globe?

At AmericanFlags.com we pride ourselves on our selection of high quality American flags, made right here in the USA. We offer American flags made by Americans, for Americans, right here at home. You’ll also find flagpoles, and a wide array of other supplies to allow you and your family to demonstrate the pride you feel toward our great land. Holidays like the Fourth of July are, of course, ideal times to display your patriotism; however, your patriotic spirit need not wait for America’s birthday to be on display! Displaying the flag shows your true American spirit year round—that same spirit which has made America the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave for more than two centuries.

Along with our wide array of items to show your pride in our great land, AmericanFlags.com also offers a complete line of historic flags, military flags, world flags, state and city flags, along with flags advertising religious and sports affiliations for indoor and outdoor use. You won’t find a more comprehensive selection of quality flags anywhere else.

Our wide range of offerings reflects the extensive history of flags, from their origin in ancient times, to their prominent role in medieval heraldry, and their continued use to reflect pride in one’s origins, or more mundane affiliations. Banners praising sports teams, promoting public events, schools, and companies can be seen everywhere. Soldiers the world over bear their country’s flag on their uniforms with grace and pride. Global sporting events such as The Olympic Games or The World Cup offer vivid visual cascades of countries represented through color. Though admirable for their simple beauty alone, these flags clearly proclaim a simple, wordless message: “I belong.”

It is no doubt this message of belonging that brought the flag to the prominent role it plays in society today. At AmericanFlags.com you’ll find what you need to display your own feelings of belonging.

South Carolina Teacher Grabs $85,000 for Stomping US Flag

South Carolina teacher Scott Compton is reportedly receiving $85,000 in settlement money after he was removed from his Chapin High School classroom after stomping on an American flag while discussing freedom. The school district paid the monies after Compton threatened a federal lawsuit. He has also received his annual salary since the incident last fall (even though he hasn’t taught since then) and will receive a letter of recommendation from the district. Compton has told reporters that he was simply trying to teach the students a lesson about American freedoms and liberties. Indeed, Compton has the right to stomp on our national symbol, but that doesn’t make it correct.  And expecting good judgement from our teachers shouldn’t be too much to ask.

A news story on Scott Compton’s payday is linked here.