MLB Flags to Celebrate the Return of Baseball Season

baseball closeup pitcher mound

If you’re a true baseball fan, you know there are only two seasons: winter and baseball. Now that winter is finally over, it’s time to start waving your baseball flag!

All sports fans love trivia, from well-documented stats to obscure little facts, and baseball fans are no exception. But did you know that Major League Baseball (MLB) flags have a set of trivia all their own?

The first thing to know is that there are 30 MLB teams, and some of them have more than one official logo design that can be used on flags. Therefore, we stock a large selection of MLB flags to help you cheer on your favorite team.

There’s a lot more to know about MLB flags, and in honor of the return of baseball season, some of that information is gathered here. After reading this list, you’ll be able to impress your friends with your encyclopedic knowledge of MLB flag trivia.

From 8 to 30: MLB team history

In the 1800s, there were only eight major league teams in existence: The Braves, Cardinals, Cubs, Dodgers, Giants, Phillies, Pirates and Reds.

In 1901, seven more were added: The Athletics, Indians, Orioles, Red Sox, Tigers, Twins and White Sox. And in 1903, the Yankees joined the club.

During the 1960s, eight more teams joined the major leagues: The Angels, Astros, Brewers, Mets, Nationals, Padres, Rangers and Royals. The 1970s brought in two more teams: The Blue Jays and Mariners.

And finally, in the 1990s, the Diamondbacks, Marlins, Rays and Rockies brought the total number of teams to 30.

Team nicknames

Team nicknames can be confusing, but they often have fascinating histories. The Los Angeles Dodgers were once the Brooklyn Dodgers, named after pedestrians dodging trolleys when crossing busy Brooklyn streets.

The Yankees originally were the Highlanders. A newspaper editor shortened the team’s name so it would be easier to fit into headlines.

The Pittsburgh Alleghenies became the Pittsburgh Pirates after their manager crossed icy waters during a storm to “steal” a star player from the rival Philadelphia team.

The New York Gothams became the New York Giants in 1885 — and in 1958, the team moved to San Francisco.

St. Louis called their team the Browns from 1883-1898, the Perfectos in 1899 and the Cardinals as of 1900. When a newspaper columnist overheard a fan saying that the team’s stockings were a lovely shade of cardinal red, he used it in his column, and the name stuck.

In 2008, the Tampa Bay Devil Rays dropped the “devil” from their name and went to the World Series the following year.

Team colors

MLB flags are colorful, featuring primary colors like red and blue. As you would expect, the Red Sox flags include a pair of red socks, and the Mariners’ main color is blue. But other colors are popular as well.

Naturally, the Orioles use orange and black, and the Athletics feature a healthy green. The Pirates’ big yellow “P” is the brightest color, while the Rockies’ purple mountains are the most unique.

Some logos are simple yet elegant letters -— for example, the Nationals’ bold red W is written in fancy script and the Pirates’ sign is a scalloped and bright yellow P. The Tigers’ symbol is a blue letter D of the old English variety. From 1994 to 2005, it also included an orange tiger striding confidently through its bars.

detroit tigers logo mosaic

Before teams were required to wear matching uniforms, it was difficult to tell “who’s on first.” Then in the early days of baseball, the Cincinnati Red Stockings started a fashion trend by requiring all their players to wear — you guessed it -— red stockings.

Soon afterward, the National League dictated specific stocking colors for each of its teams. It was only a matter of time before teams incorporated these colors into other parts of their uniforms as well.

Flag styles

Our flags feature a choice of designs for each team. For example, our Pirates flags come in five different versions, including a popular “Jolly Roger” style.

Our banners (vertical flags) are designed to hang from a horizontal pole and can be displayed outside of the home or indoors against a wall. Standard flags come with D-rings and are meant to be flown from a pole or hung on a wall surface.

Garden banners look cheerful anywhere outside and will boost your spirits while you’re mowing your lawn or doing the weeding. One of our most popular options, car flags let you take your team pride with you wherever you go.

Flag sizes

Our MLB flag sizes are as follows:

  • Banner: 27” x 37”
  • Flag: 3’ x 5’
  • Garden Banner: 11” x 15”
  • Car Flag: 11.75” x 14”

 

Logo design history

Louis B. Tiffany designed the Yankees logo with the interlocking N and Y in 1877.

The Mets held a logo design contest in 1961. More than 500 people entered, but the $1,000 prize was awarded to newspaper cartoonist Ray Gotto for his iconic skyline-and-bridge within a baseball design.

MLB logos are continually being updated. Some changes are more drastic than others. The Red Sox logo has always been red, but it didn’t always feature a pair of socks. The Giants logo has undergone six different versions, but a baseball always stayed at the heart of its design.

Even though the St. Louis team became the Cardinals in 1900, their logo just said “STL” until 1922, when somebody thought of using a pair of cardinals balancing on a bat to represent the team.

louis cardinals tony larussa

The final score

It’s true that baseball fans love their trivia, but there’s nothing trivial about their love of the game. So as the baseball season gets underway, why not celebrate with a flag commemorating America’s favorite pastime?

Leave a Reply